How To Eat Healthy At Restaurants

Don’t let enjoying a lunch or dinner out at a restaurant ruin your healthy eating goals.   Follow my easy tips for how to eat healthy at restaurants to see how eating out healthy is possible and delicious!

How To Eat Healthy At Restaurants | Eating healthy at restaurants can be tricky.  Follow my easy tips for how to eat healthy at restaurants.  Eating out healthy is possible! | A Sweet Pea Chef

One of the most difficult things I’ve found when trying to follow a healthy lifestyle is eating out at restaurants.  When you work so hard at home to follow healthy eating guidelinesOpens in a new tab., eating at a restaurant can feel like a step backwards.  At restaurants, you can say goodbye to knowing everything that goes into your food and, most likely, to avoiding unhealthy ingredients, like butter, salt, and lots of saturated fats.

You could say, “Well, I just wont eat out, then.”  But, realistically, that’s just not gonna happen.  Eating at restaurants is fun and social and new.

The good news is that it’s still totally possible to eat at restaurants AND be healthy – you just need a few tricks up your sleeve so you can be prepared to make good, healthy choices.

Here are my best tips for how to eat healthy at restaurants.  Trust me, it’s possible – let me show you how!

11 Tips For Healthy Eating At Restaurants

1. Scan the menu.

Look for key words on the menu that are giveaways for what to avoid.  Here are some examples of the most common culprits:

  • pan-fried
  • crispy
  • dipped
  • scalloped
  • breaded
  • cream
  • alfredo

Dishes with these words tend to have a lot of hidden fat and salt.   Instead, look for menu items with words from the following list:

  • grilled
  • steamed
  • baked
  • roasted
  • braised
  • broiled
  • seared

2. Eat some meat.

Bowl of brown rice pilaf with flank steak to illustrate how to add meat to your order when trying to eat healthy at restaurants.

Meat has a ton of protein and, when lean, is a great idea to order.  When ordering meat, pick leaner cuts of beef (great options include flank steak, skirt steak, tenderloin, sirloin, or filet mignon).

When in doubt, chicken is another great high protein, low fat option, particularly chicken breast.

Eating meat will help you to feel full and satisfied without having to fill up on empty carbs, like pasta or bread.

3. Ask to double or triple the vegetables.

Let’s be real.  Often, a side of vegetables in a restaurant is really more of a garnish, not a real serving. When ordering, ask for double or triple the normal serving of veggies, and offer to pay extra (more often than not, you won’t even be charged).  You could also look to the Sides portion of the menu to see what options the restaurant has available.

A big problem with veggies is that they get cooked in a ton of butter so make sure to ask that the vegetables NOT be cooked in butter when you order them.  This is an easy way to escape unneeded fat and calories.

4. Go ethnic. 

Two bowls of Szechuan eggplant to show how eating healthy at restaurants is possible if you order the right menu items.

When it comes to ethnic food, some options (like Japanese, Thai, Greek, and Indian restaurants) are easier to eat healthier than others (like Mexican, Chinese, or Italian restaurants).  While you can successfully eat healthy in any restaurant, the main reason why it’s easier for the first options is because they feature grilled meats, less pastas and/or noodles, and other non-fried options.

This doesn’t mean you should totally avoid the other types of restaurants.  Just know it may be a little trickier to find what you’re looking for which means your options will be limited.

5. Ask about preparation.

Truth: Chefs are trained to use lots of butter and salt to heighten flavors.  Duh, right?  It tastes good. They do this because, if you add butter or salt on most anything, it tastes better which makes the customer happy which means more business in the future.  They’re not there for your health.  They’re there to feed you tasty food.

If you’re concerned about the butter or salt in your food, don’t be afraid to ask your server how the food is prepared. If you find out what you want is actually loaded with oil or butter, either ask for it to be prepared differently or choose something else.

6. Don’t be afraid to ask.  

Along the same lines as the previous tip, I highly recommend that you ask the waiter/waitress questions about how the food is prepared if you’re not clear. You’ll only know for sure what’s in your food if you ask. This can literally mean a difference of hundreds of calories and tons of unnecessary fat.

Is it uncomfortable?  A little at first, but it’s your responsibility to know what you’re putting into your body and your waiter’s responsibility to know what goes into the food they’re serving.  The more you ask, the easier it gets, I promise!

7. Look for these desserts.

Two bowls of cantaloupe sorbet to show there are healthier dessert options when eating out healthy at restaurants.

Desserts are a fun part of eating out at restaurants and can be a huge bummer if you’re trying to eat healthy.  If you want to splurge on a dessert, you do have some options.  My favorite thing to do is to order one dessert for the table. That way, you don’t eat the entire dessert and feel totally awful.  Instead, you enjoy a few bites and satisfy your sweet tooth.  If you’d rather not share, another great idea is to ask your waiter for a simple dish of berries or a fruit sorbet.

8. Box it early.

Did you know restaurants often serve two to three times what you actually need for a normal serving?  Next time, ask to box half your entrée BEFORE it ever even gets to the table.  This will save you money and calories.  It may sound weird, but it makes tons of sense.  You can also split an entrée with another person, if you’d prefer.

9. Skip the fancy pants drinks. 

If you must order an alcoholic drink, try to avoid margaritas, piña coladas, and other exotic mixed drinks. They include sugary add-ins that add tons of calories and processed sugars and flavors.

Instead, order a glass of wine, a light beer, a vodka and tonic, or a simple martini.  These options will be better for your healthy eating goals, especially if you choose not to drink that often.

10. Order fish.

Halibut picatta over steamed asparagus and topped with capers to show how fish is a great menu item when eating out healthy at restaurants.

Fish is a great option, as long as it’s not fried. You can order seafood in tons of different ways—steamed, blackened, baked, broiled, sautéed, or grilled. My favorite is grilled.

Just like with meat, fish allows you to enjoy protein, fill up on real food, and avoid foods loaded in carbs and unhealthy fats.  While it may be a bit pricier, it’s often a great option on the menu, especially if it’s fresh fish.

11. Drink water throughout the meal. 

Try your best to get used to drinking water as your main beverage.  Drinking water will slow you down from eating your food too fast, which will help you enjoy the food more, and it will allow your brain to get the message form your stomach that you’re full so you don’t overeat before your plate is already empty.

You can ask for a slice of lemon, if plain water is too boring.  To ease into just having water, you can also wait to order a different beverage until after you’ve finsihed your first glass of water.

How To Eat Healthy At Restaurants

What To Order To Eat Healthy At Restaurants

Eating out and wanting to pick something healthy off the menu?  Here are my favorite go-to menu items for specific types of restaurants so you know you’re making a healthy choice.

How to Eat Healthy at Italian Restaurants 

  • minestroneOpens in a new tab.
  • pasta fagioli
  • house salad
  • caesar salad
  • fresh fish or seafood that is cooked in olive oil
  • choose red sauces, like cacciatoreOpens in a new tab. or marsalaOpens in a new tab.

How to Eat Healthy at Thai Restaurants 

  • tom yum soup
  • curry with tofu, veggies, or chicken
  • fish with veggies
  • summer rolls
  • beef and broccoliOpens in a new tab.
  • satay

How to Eat Healthy at Mexican Restaurants 

  • ceviche
  • guacamoleOpens in a new tab. (without many tortilla chips)
  • black beans
  • grilled fish
  • fajitas (without many tortillas)
  • choose corn tortillasOpens in a new tab. over flour tortillas
  • burrito bowlOpens in a new tab.
  • taco salad (without the taco shell)

How to Eat Healthy at Japanese Restaurants 

  • sushi and sashimi
  • edamame
  • miso soup
  • grilled seafood
  • ginger salad
  • teriyaki chickenOpens in a new tab. or salmon (with sauce on the side)

How to Eat Healthy at Chinese Restaurants 

  • beef and broccoliOpens in a new tab. (or chicken and broccoli)
  • brown rice instead of white rice
  • mixed vegetables
  • moo goo gai pan
  • schezuan eggplant
  • kung pao chicken (not fried)
  • Buddha’s delight

Now, all you need to do is use these tips the next time you go out to eat.  The more you use them, the better you’ll get at spotting healthy versus unhealthy options and it will feel more and more natural.  The bottom line is it’s possible to make good choicesOpens in a new tab. and have control over your food – even at restaurants.

Did I miss anything?  What’s your best tip for how to eat healthy at restaurants?  Share in the comments below!

Lacey Baier

Hey y’all, I’m Lacey Baier and I’m so glad you’re here! I’m a healthy lifestyle influencer and the creator of this clean-eating blog and YouTube channel, A Sweet Pea Chef. My recipes have been published on Food Network, Good Morning America, FoxNews, Tastemade, Fitness Magazine, and much more. I live in Dallas, Texas with my husband and four kiddos. Let’s get started!

66 thoughts on “How To Eat Healthy At Restaurants

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  3. I liked that you mentioned you need to consider asking about how the food is prepared to choose the right restaurant. My husband and I are thinking about finding a restaurant to have breakfast, and we are looking for advice about what to do. I will let him know about your recommendations to choose the right restaurant for our breakfast.

  4. I really appreciate your advice to stop ordering fancy drinks as they can have lots of extra sugars. My New Years’ resolution is to try to lose some weight. However, I also want to branch out and try new restaurants and enjoy good food. Thank you for the advice on how to have a little more control when eating out. I think I will have to look for great new restaurants to try these tips at!

  5. Hey Lacey, You have mentioned a good list of cuisines. I always go for extra veggies and beef. I already knew about some of the healthy Chinese food, but healthy Italian and Mexican food list is something new to me. Now, I’ll definitely give it a try. Thanks for sharing.

  6. My wife’s birthday is coming and normally I cook for her but this time, I won’t have time for it. I found it interesting when you said that you can still eat healthy in a restaurant because my wife follows a diet. I will look for a place where they serve good food for her and our kids.

  7. These are all great tips! Giving in to your unhealthy cravings is okay in moderation. I really like the portion control chart. Measuring is really inconvenient sometimes but this guide makes everything easier.
    Thank You For Sharing.

  8. I like your idea of asking about how the food is prepared and possibly asking it to be made without as much butter & salt. My wife and I are working on losing weight, but we don’t want to give up on going out to eat on date night entirely. This sounds like a good way to let us still have the experience without consistently giving ourselves setbacks.

  9. My husband’s birthday is coming and I’m so lazy to cook for him. I’m thinking of scheduling a dinner date with him at one of the famous steak restaurants in the other city. Thanks for your tips on how to eat healthy at a restaurant, I’ll be sure to keep this in mind and I’ll try to ask the waiter/waitress questions about their specialties and how the food is prepared. Cheers!

  10. It’s good to know that water can help you to slow down while eating at a restaurant. My wife wants to start a diet, and she wants to make sure that she doesn’t eat too quickly and overfill herself. I’ll pass this information along to her so that she can look further into her options for drinking more water.

  11. It’s great how you elaborated on asking for double or triple the normal serving of veggies, especially since they usually come for free. My wife has been considering going on a diet, but she is not familiar with what is healthy or unhealthy. Being more conscious of healthy meats and fats as well as eating more vegetables seems like it would be a good start for her.

  12. These are some pretty good tips; after all, if you don’t know what you’re doing then it can be hard to eat healthy at a restaurant. One of the better tips would definitely have to be the one about ordering a bigger serving size of vegetables. That way you can actually get some nutrition from the meal that they end up serving you.

  13. your recipe is awesome I follow you all recipe good work. keep it up.

    Amazing Tips, Thank you for sharing this …….. post really this is awesome tips thanks for guiding me

  14. Although it will always be better to eat and cook at home, in a luxurious restaurant you have options to choose as long as we look at the quality of the ingredients as well as the cooking method and the accompaniments of each dish that is proposed before selecting the healthiest alternative for taste.

  15. I was very happy to read your post because I searched many websites but did not find as unique and helpful information on them. That’s why I liked your post very much. Thank you

  16. This is the very rare and unique info for all peoples because its benefits is its find on google so easy and i have share this info with friends because its really so educational info and its help me in my education thanks and keep writing.

  17. Congratulations! I found your website and I kid you not. I fell in love with your tips and I am going to follow your tips to whenever I go for the lunch or dinner in a hotel I make sure I follow all the tips that you have shared in the article.peace.

  18. Salads with a grilled protein like salmon or chicken, with no dressing, or dressing on the side that you dip your fork into before taking a bite. Go for fiber with lots of raw or cooked veggies to fill you up. Drink a full glass of water before you eat your first bite. Pick a “heathy” restaurant before you even leave, and know what you’re going to order in advance. Don’t be afraid to ask for modifications and sub broccoli for calorie-laden sides like Mac and cheese or mashed potatoes. Don’t let the waiter leave a bread basket and butter on the table, or endless baskets of chips and salsa. Get a mocktail like tonic water, fresh lemon juice and muddled basil to have a refreshing low calorie beverage that helps you feel less left out.

  19. I really enjoyed reading these tips. Most people complaints about the restaurant foods but what to eat is totally dependent on you. By following these tips they can enjoy the restaurant food without compromising their healthy diet plan.

    Thanks for sharing!

  20. I love going out to eat and trying new things but it’s difficult to balance that with staying on a healthy diet. I really liked your tips especially the one about drinking water during the meal to help you slow down your eating and keep you from overeating. Waiting until you’re done with at least your first glass of water before you order another drink is good advice as well that will keep you from drinking too many calories and save you money. I’ll have to keep this in mind next time we head out for a meal.

  21. I have been trying to start a diet recently, but I still eat out a lot due to work, so thanks for sharing this. I like your point about getting fish and veggies from Thai restaurants. I’ll have to start getting more vegetables in my meals in this case.

  22. I really like what you said about ordering meat and how it has a ton of protein. This is something that I am always looking out for because I have been working out a lot lately and getting a good intake of protein is important to me. It would be great if I could find a steakhouse or seafood restaurant in my local area because by eating there I can really pack on the protein.

  23. I like the tip you left about asking for double or triple the vegetables and how I should ask to not have them covered in something like butter. My wife and I are looking for healthy alternatives to many of the fast food restaurants around that serve very greasy food. We like to feel good after eating out so finding a healthy restaurant is very important to us.

  24. It sure was nice that I came across this article because I learned that restaurants actually service two to three times that normal serving and so it is good for a person to ask that half the entree is boxed if they’re on a diet. I will surely give that a try because a friend of mine is inviting me to eat at a restaurant this weekend. I want to know what I can do so as to now ruin my diet, and this tip is by far the most helpful. Thank you!

  25. There are nearly 200,000 “table side” restaurants in the United States today, a number that continues to grow. But like fast-food outlets, these dining establishments can be ticking time bombs when it comes to nutritional health. Government surveys find that the food you typically eat when you’re not home is nutritionally worse in every way than the food you eat at home.

    Nearly all the chains have added healthier options to their menus—if you know how to look for them. You can also rely on these tips to help making eating out a healthier treat.

    1. Ask for it your way. Dining out is no time to be a meek consumer, notes Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D., executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and coauthor of the book Restaurant Confidential. “You need to be an assertive consumer by asking for changes on the menu,” he says. For instance, if an item is fried, ask for it grilled. If it comes with french fries, ask for a side of veggies instead. Ask for a smaller portion of the meat and a larger portion of the salad; for salad instead of coleslaw; baked potato instead of fried. “Just assume you can have the food prepared the way you want it,” says Dr. Jacobson. “Very often, the restaurant will cooperate.”

    2. Ask to “triple the vegetables, please.” Often a side of vegetables in a restaurant is really like garnish—a carrot and a forkful of squash. When ordering, ask for three or four times the normal serving of veggies, and offer to pay extra. “I’ve never been charged,” says dietitian Jeff Novick, R.D., director of nutrition at the Pritikin Longevity Center & Spa in Aventura, Florida. “And I’ve never been disappointed. I get full, not fat.”

    3. Ask how the food was prepared; don’t go by the menu. For instance, cholesterol-free does not mean fat-free; the dish could still be filled with calorie-dense oil. Neither does “lite” necessarily mean light in calories or fat.

    4. Order from the “healthy, light, low fat” entrées on the menu. Most chains will even list the calories and nutritional content of such foods. Applebee’s, for instance, offers approved Weight Watchers options, Bennigan’s has its Health Club entrées (which it will serve in half portions), and Ruby Tuesday lists the nutritional information for its entire menu.

    5. Beware of the low-carb options. Restaurant chains have jumped on the low-carb bandwagon, offering numerous low-carb options on their menu. But low-carb doesn’t mean low-cal. For instance, at Ruby Tuesday the Low-Carb New Orleans Seafood packs 710 calories and 42 grams of fat—ouch! A much better bet—the Low Carb Veggie Platter—leaves you with just 297 calories and 16 grams of fat.

    6. Ask to box half your entrée before it ever gets to the table. Or split an entrée with your dining partner. A CSPI survey found that restaurants often serve two to three times more than food labels list as a serving.

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    7. Try double appetizers. If there is a nice selection of seafood- and vegetable-based appetizers, consider skipping the entrée and having two appetizers for your meal. Often, that is more than enough food to fill you up.

    8. Order a salad before ordering anything else on the menu. Scientists at Pennsylvania State University found that volunteers who ate a big veggie salad before the main course ate fewer calories overall than those who didn’t have a first-course salad, notes Novick.

    9. But remember: Salads shouldn’t be fatty. This is a vegetable course—keep it tasty but healthy. That means avoiding anything in a creamy sauce (coleslaw, pasta salads, and potato salads), and skipping the bacon bits and fried noodles. Instead, load up on the raw vegetables, treat yourself to a few well-drained marinated vegetables (artichoke hearts, red peppers, or mushrooms), and for a change, add in some fruit or nuts. Indeed, fruits such as mango, kiwi, cantaloupe, and pear are often the secret ingredient in four-star salads.

    10. Watch the add-ons to vegetable salads. Even salads that are mostly raw vegetables are a problem if they’re loaded with cheese and meats. Take the typical Caesar salad in most restaurants (the one topped with chicken or shrimp as well as plenty of cheese and mayo in the dressing). Add in the fried croutons and the calories add up to a whopping 560, with 36 grams of fat, 6 of them saturated. Italian antipasto salads also are a health challenge, with all their salami, spicy ham, and cheese. Get the salad, but ask for vegetables only.

    11. Do the fork dip. The best way to combine salad dressing with salad? Get your dressing on the side, in a small bowl. Dip your empty fork into the dressing, then skewer a forkful of salad. You’ll be surprised at how this tastes just right, and how little dressing you’ll use. Plus, your lettuce won’t wilt and drown in a sea of oil.

    12. Check the menu before you leave home. Most chains post their menus on their Web sites. For instance, Ruby Tuesday’s Smart Eating menu tells you the restaurant only uses canola oil and even provides nutritional information on its salad bar. You can decide before you ever hit the hostess stand what you’re going to order. Conversely, if you don’t see anything that’s healthy, pick another restaurant.

    13. Read between the lines. Any menu description that uses the words creamy, breaded, crisp, sauced, or stuffed is likely loaded with hidden fats—much of it saturated or even trans fats. Other “beware of” words include: buttery, sautéed, pan-fried, au gratin, Thermidor, Newburg, Parmesan, cheese sauce, scalloped, and au lait, à la mode, or au fromage (with milk, ice cream, or cheese).

    14. Ask the waiter to skip the bread basket. If you must have something to munch on while you wait for your order, ask for a plate of raw vegetables or some breadsticks.

    15. Skip the fancy drinks. If you must order an alcoholic drink, forget the margaritas, piña coladas, and other exotic mixed drinks. They include sugary additions that only add calories. Opt instead for a glass of wine, a light beer, a vodka and tonic or a simple martini (without the chocolate liquor, sour green apple schnapps, or triple sec).

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    16. Top a baked potato with veggies from the salad bar. Or ask if they have salsa—the ultimate potato topper, both in terms of flavor and health. Just avoid the butter and sour cream.

    17. Order fish. Just make sure it’s not fried. When the CSPI evaluated food served at seafood chains and independent restaurants, researchers found low-fat and low-sodium options abounded. Plus, you can order seafood so many different ways—steamed, baked, broiled, sautéed, blackened, or grilled. Nix any sauces, or ask for them on the side.

    18. Drink water throughout the meal. It will slow you down, help you enjoy the food more, and let the message get to your brain that you’re full—before your plate is empty.

    19. Always dress up to go out. Even if it’s just a regular family restaurant. If you view eating out as an event or a treat, rather than a way to get an everyday dinner, you won’t eat out as often. And that’s good from both a health and a cost standpoint.

    20. Skip the dessert. You can always have some sorbet or even a small piece of chocolate at home. That is much better healthwise than the Triple Chocolate Meltdown or a mountain of ice cream topped by a second mountain of whipped cream.

  26. These are all great tips! Giving in to your unhealthy cravings is okay in moderation. I really like the portion control chart. Measuring is really inconvenient sometimes but this guide makes everything easier.

  27. I’ve read so many amazing things about your article! I enjoyed reading it. Really it such an informative post. Our family enjoys eating out. I want to become healthy and it only can happen by eating healthy food. Thanks for sharing the nice blog.

  28. I do like how you mentioned that it may seem harder to eat healthy at some restaurants, but you can get some fresh fish cooked in olive oil, red sauces, salads, Pasta Fagioli, and minestrone from Italian restaurants to quench your health needs. That is perfect as my family is pleading me to go out for an Italian style dinner later. Trying to be healthy is quite a hard work so I’m glad they have some options for me. Thanks!

  29. Surely, your suggestion of getting used drinking water as the main beverage will help me out a lot. Like you said, water will help me by slowing down my eating pace and allowing me to enjoy the food more. I will take note of that because my brother and I were planning to eat at a pizza restaurant next week on his birthday. I’m following a strict diet, but I don’t want to let him down either. So on that day, I’ll take it easy, but I’ll still eat pizza with him. Thanks for the tips. I could really use them.

  30. It was really nice how you said that one way to eat healthy at a restaurant was by asking the server to box half of the entree before it even gets to the table. That’s a really nice thing to be aware of, especially since we’re planning to eat out next week. We’ve been eating a lot in Chinese restaurants and Italian restaurants, now I have this craving for Meditteranean cuisine, but I want to remain fit while giving in to my cravings. Thanks.

  31. I found it extremely interesting that you mentioned how there are usually certain words within the description on an entree that will give away it’s unhealthiness. My older brother is looking to find a quality breakfast diner that he can go to before work since he prefers eating out for breakfast. I think I will talk to him about paying attention to works like “pan-fried”, “cream”, and “baked” to keep a healthy diet.

  32. Thanks for these tips for eating healthier at restaurants. I actually didn’t know that eating seafood could actually be a good option. You went over some different ways that it can be ordered, and I’m interested to learn more about what these are and how they can affect the taste of the fish.

  33. It makes sense that eating slow and drinking a bit of water would help you keep from overeating. Doing some research on the places to eat in your are could give you a good idea or portion sizes as well so you can keep in mind how big the meal will be in general. I don’t think that it would make sense to go to a buffet when you only want a salad so knowing where you are going and what they serve will help you make those healthy choices.

  34. I really liked all the suggestions the article has about eating healthy when going out to restaurants. I especially liked the suggestion to consider splitting a meal or saving extra food for another serving another day instead of trying to eat the entire thing. My wife and I are trying to eat healthier, but going out to eat is an easy and fun way for us to spend time together. We’ll be sure to keep these tips in mind going forward!

  35. Eating at restaurants is one of my family’s favorite activities to do together. We really enjoy experiencing new things together including new food. I didn’t occur to me to ask the server to double or triple the amount of vegetables that are in the dish to create a more nutritious meal. I’ll have to remember that next time we go out.

  36. In your article, you stated that often, a side of vegetables in a restaurant is really like a garnish, not a real serving and when ordering, ask for double or triple the normal serving of veggies, and offer to pay extra. My wife and I have been going on a strict diet lately but we really want to go out to eat for date night. I wonder if there are certain ways that healthy restaurants prepare their food that is different from other places.

    1. They’ll def focus on lowering the amount of unnecessary fats and salts needed and will allow for more options that are not fried. That makes it much easier to choose fresh, whole options 🙂

  37. I’m going on a trip and want to still be able to eat healthy at places. Thanks for the advice about how you can ask for double or triple the vegetables. I’ll have to follow your advice and also make sure to get whole wheat bread instead of white.

  38. I love eating out and discovering new and exciting restaurants. It can be hard to continue my search for the best when I am trying to eat healthy. These tips are great and I will put them to use. I especially like how you suggest to ask tor more vegetables. I’ll do that next time instead of taking the side of fries! Thanks!

  39. I had no idea that fish was a healthier food to get at restaurants. Fish is so delicious it is a little more expensive typically but if it is healthier I should just get it. Salmon is my favorite kind of fish and most nice places usually provide that. What meat is next healthiest if there is no fish option?

    1. So glad to share that info with you 🙂 Next healthiest would likely be a boneless, skinless chicken breast or a lean cut of steak — but it really is more dependent on how it is prepared than the cut of meat.

  40. This is some great information, and I appreciate your point that Indian restaurants are easier to eat healthy at. One of my New Year’s resolutions this year involves eating healthier, but my husband and I like to go out to eat a few times a month. I’ll definitely look into going to Indian restaurants more frequently so it’s easy to pick nutritious dishes. Thanks for the great post!

  41. I really like these suggestions. I try to avoid bread too If a waiter says they will bring bread I try to tell them not too before I change my mind, I like these ideas.

    1. YES, that’s a great idea and one I didn’t even think to add to the list but is a super easy way to remove those extra un-needed foods even from reaching your table. Also – no chips is another one 🙂 Thanks for sharing!

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